The substitutive industrialization model constitutes a burdensome legacy that conditions the exit from the crisis and the design of a new development model for Mexico. It stands that industrial modernization and economic progress demand the adoption of an external growth strategy and that the exportation of high value added products and services should increasingly contribute to generate the necessary resources for creating jobs, increasing revenues, boosting internal savings and stimulating industrial growth through domestic demand. The article offers a conceptual framework that takes into account the dynamic and systemic nature of economic and social development in Mexico and analyzes the relationships established among the main factors that inhibit its industrial development and set a vicious cycle of low investment, technology backwardness, and economic stagnation. The study identifies valuable components in the design of public and corporate policies for stimulating managerial development and creating conditions for optimum use of the opportunities offered by the globalization of commercial, financial and technological flows.

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Conference Mexican Academy of Sciences, the National Council of Science and Technology from Mexico (CONACY)
Citation
Cardoza, G, Flores, J., & Villa, J. (2004). Business Development and Competitiveness in Mexico: Factors that Inhibit the Adoption of a Virtuous Cycle of Innovation and Growth. Presented at the Mexican Academy of Sciences, the National Council of Science and Technology from Mexico (CONACY).